The NCAA Board of Governors has voted to approve the terms of a settlement that would resolve several antitrust lawsuits against the NCAA and would require the organization to pay nearly $2.8 billion over a 10-year period to former Division I athletes and institute a revenue-sharing model between certain schools and athletes.  The details of

The arrival of name, image, and likeness (NIL) agreements has transformed college athletics, offering student-athletes unprecedented opportunities to profit from their personal brands.  Yet, the case of Jaden Rashada, a promising quarterback, is a cautionary tale.

When Rashada entered the 2023 college recruitment season, the NCAA had recently adopted rules allowing compensation to student-athletes for

As restrictions lessen on collegiate athletes’ ability to be compensated for their name, image, and likeness (NIL), international student-athletes in F-1 status continue to be at risk if they pursue these economic opportunities. On April 29, 2024, a bipartisan group of U.S. senators penned a letter to Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas

Tennessee Senator Marsha Blackburn (R) and New Jersey Senator Cory Booker (D) have reintroduced the “NCAA Accountability Act.”  This follows multiple hearings held over the past few years on NCAA operations, including how the NCAA handles investigations and enforcement of its bylaws.

The bipartisan bill seeks to enhance due process protections for intercollegiate athletic programs

The U.S. Department of Justice, alongside the District of Columbia and states of Mississippi, Virginia, Minnesota, joined seven other states in their antitrust challenge against the NCAA’s transfer eligibility rule.

The rule blocks some student-athletes from immediately competing after transferring between colleges and has been a recent source of contention in the world of college

NCAA President Charlie Baker penned a letter to student-athletes, asking for feedback on his proposal to allow Division I (D-I) schools to pay student-athletes directly.

In the December 19 letter, Baker emphasized that schools and student-athletes need to partner with Congress in seeking a federal law with an antitrust exemption preventing college athletes from being

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) faces a new legal challenge as seven U.S. states have filed a federal lawsuit alleging the NCAA’s student-athlete transfer eligibility rule violates U.S. antitrust law.

Transfer Eligibility Rule

NCAA rules currently permit undergraduate college athletes to transfer once with immediate eligibility to compete at their new university. However, subsequent

NCAA President Charlie Baker has advanced the idea of giving universities and colleges (with the most-resourced athletic departments) the option to pay student-athletes. The emergence of national, image, and likeness (NIL) deals are exerting increasing influence on the landscape of collegiate athletics (and growing the disparities between the have and have-nots of college universities). In

November 7, 2023, may become a monumental day in the history of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). It is the first day of a potentially groundbreaking hearing. Region 21 of the National Labor Relations Board will be hearing a case brought by members of the football, men’s basketball, and women’s basketball teams against the